Understanding Aromatherapy Scents (Part 1)

Chamomile and Lavender: Making Sense of Scents

These two soothing herbs, chamomile and lavender, share many of the same properties, yet are also distinctly individual. Let’s break down each herb by their scent, properties, and uses to better understand how they can benefit us.


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Chamomile: The flowering herb originates from the Compositae family. With two types of chamomile in our products, both German chamomile and Roman chamomile, they are just as noble as they sound.

German chamomile is native to Europe, carries an intense aroma, and has a natural deep ink blue hue when used in essential oils. This type of chamomile is suitable for babies and children. The properties of this herb help with allergies, aid in calming, and are known to create a sense of balance.

Roman chamomile is native to the southern and western areas of Europe and has a warm apple aroma. With a pale blue color present in essentials oils, this herb aids in calming. Unlike its German cousin, Roman chamomile is not suitable for babies and children.

Both types of chamomile are commonly used as a tea to drink before bedtime to promote relaxation. They also have powerful anti-inflammatory properties and provide a mild sedative effect.

Did you know?

  • Chamomile harvested during the early stages of flowering is best used as a tea infusion to treat anxiety, indigestion, insomnia, muscle pain, and cramps.
  • Chamomile essential oils are commonly used to enhance the body’s ability to fight off infections and inflammation due to its anti-inflammatory properties.
  • The blossoms of a chamomile plant are the most valuable part, as they are used to make teas, oils, tonics, infusions, and extracts.

 


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Lavender: Another plant with calming properties, lavender is not only beautiful but also useful. Deriving from the Lamiaceae or Labiatae families, dependent upon if it’s the plant or the essential oil, lavender is native to the Mediterranean region. A sweet and floral scent with a colorless to pale yellow color present in the essential oil, this plant can help as an antidepressant, enhances a feeling of calmness and balance, and works as a healer and antiseptic. Best for adults only when applying essential oil directly to skin or using products that contain large amounts of lavender essential oil, lavender works wonders for anxiety, headaches, menstrual cramps, depression, indigestion, sleeplessness, nerve pain, tooth pain, sprains, and even dandruff.

Did you know?

  • Lavender essential oil can help with hair loss, has antimicrobial properties, and may reduce agitation in people with Alzheimer’s. That’s some powerful stuff.
  • Drinking lavender tea can help with insomnia, stress, and exhaustion.
  • Together, chamomile and lavender can be quite the powerhouse. If you have a black eye, apply a few drops of lavender or chamomile oil and witch hazel to a cotton ball and apply to the bruised area (just avoid getting into your eyes). These two can also help with abrasions and blisters, just apply a drop or two to a compress and put over a blister or scrape to help the healing process. A few drops of both oils, mixed with some jojoba oil, can be applied to your hairline and massaged into your scalp to help with headaches. And with bug season upon us, just mix a drop of the two together and apply to bug bites to take the itch away.